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The Sun Also Rises (Forum Locked Forum Locked)
 Ernest Hemingway Message Boards : The Sun Also Rises
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Brian B.
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Posted: 14 November 2005 at 1:16pm | IP Logged Quote Brian B.

The "Lost Generation" was a phrase coined by Gertrude Stein which referred to a time period post to World War I. The name "Lost Generation" itself is used to describe the mood of practically the more developed countries of the world after World War I, which consisted of many lyriscist (writers,poets, novelists, essayists, etc.). As supported by http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_Generation, the term "Lost Generation" is being used for the generation of young people coming of age in the United States, during and shortly after World War I. For this reason, the generation is sometimes known as the World War I Generation or the Roaring 20s. Generation. In Europe, they are most often known as the Generation of 1914, named after the year World War I began. In France, the country in which many expatriates settled, they are called the Génération au Feu, the Generation of Fire. Although this generation has been around for a while, it would'nt be quite accurate if you were to say that this generation was yet extinct. The reason for this is because "Lost Generation" survivors are still leaving; but eventually, this generation will be brought to an end.  
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lyzj
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Posted: 14 November 2005 at 1:20pm | IP Logged Quote lyzj

A definition of the lost generation is group of writers whose early years as an adult, most born in the last decade of the nineteenth century, were framed by World War I and not by thier American heritage.  Thier talents and way of thinking was shaped by thier experiences from the war and thier exile from American life.  Some writers, for example, include Hart Crane, E.E. Cummings, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thorton Wilder, and Thomas Wolfe.

http://www.lths.net/Academics/LearningResources/SubjectLinks /LostGeneration.htm

 

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Mike N
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Posted: 14 November 2005 at 1:23pm | IP Logged Quote Mike N

I believe there is a working definition of the lost generation. It consists of the people that were living around the time of the first world war. After the war these people had a very different view of the world after being active participants in the war. They found it hard to return to a normal laid back life which was how the world was prior to the war.

http://www.bartleby.com/59/10/lostgenerati.html

The way this definition can be applied to the stated authors is that all of them lived during this time period of the lost generation and participated events during the time period. They wrote many stories based off of the romances that could've occured at that time. They also experienced these romances first hand with Hemmingway as an example with his 4 wives.

The Sun Also Rises was first published in 1926. Around this time, there were several problems in Spain that were leading up to the Spanish Civil War. It is possible, although he wasn't living in Spain yet that Hemmingway was influenced by the events that were occuring there that lead up to the war from as far away as the US.



Edited by Mike N on 16 November 2005 at 10:16pm
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rbarnett
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Posted: 14 November 2005 at 1:23pm | IP Logged Quote rbarnett

The Lost Generation was a period of time in the early 20th century that affected much of the world.  In America, it was known as Roaring 20’s or the WWI Generation. In Europe, especially Paris, France, it was called the Generation of Fire. The traits of this generation are based on the feeling many Americans had after the WWI. Many felt the war was pointless and only led to the slaughter of humans in a merciless way. It made people feel alienated and without morals.

It is quite clear that Hemingway's novel portrays this sense of anomie. Characters are constantly drinking away their problems and using people. The novel is portraying this time.

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Samantha S.
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Posted: 14 November 2005 at 6:45pm | IP Logged Quote Samantha S.

I'd like to voice a suggestion. I was reading through everyone's entries, and I figured that, if I really wanted to say something, I should play with the fun message board and post it, rather than wait until Wednesday. So, here we go, putting off the history homework. I think that maybe for this forum, we shouldn't have defined questions to answer so much as a general discussion topic--and I mean 'discussion!' No one is really responding to other people's posts; they're mainly just repeating the information that came before them. It gets very dry, very fast, both to read and to write. Maybe we could concentrate on the authors that we know everyone has read? I posted commentary about Faulkner and I think that I'm the only person who even read As I Lay Dying--not to mention that I liked it enough to be willing to talk about it. Well, that was all I wanted to say--just that I thought this would be a lot more fun than it's looking like. Sorry if everyone thinks I'm a total loser now...

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SeanM
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Posted: 14 November 2005 at 8:15pm | IP Logged Quote SeanM

Obviously sam has the right idea. We're all just reposting the same thing over and over again, and once 3/4 gets the questions, there's nothing left to say! Personally I am baffled by Hemingway and I want to drill a hole through the book right now. From what I've heard from one of my older sisters, hemingway uses similar plot agendas for all of his novels which go something like: they wake up, they have a drink, they go to work for a few hours, they have another drink, they go to lunch, they have yet another drink, they go out to dinner, they drink again, they go out partying, they have a few more drinks, they go to bed, and then the whole thing repeats day after day! Apparently the lost generation thinks that it can drown away its sorrows in booze. They constantly move around from place to place finding no relief from their daily woes. I think that the characters are completely immature and they try to act "grown up" by doing adult things, like drinking! Maybe hemingway has the right idea, that you can't run away from your sorrows, and that you have to face your problems head on, like a bull fighter! I think I just had a major breakthrough with my disliking of The Sun Also Rises, but it is still on my not-so-favorite list. 
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kevinf
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Posted: 15 November 2005 at 10:50am | IP Logged Quote kevinf

The "Lost Generation" is a group of writers from the early nineteenth century who didn't like the American white Anglo-Saxon culture and preferred the cosmopolitan culture of Europe, where all cultures are accepted, particularly the more care-free kind preferred by Hemingway.

------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------------------------

To respond to Sean's post...it doesn't seem like there is a lot going on in the book but it's still not as bad as some other books I've read.

 

Edit: Whoops--forgot the source... http://users.rowan.edu/~lindman/lost_generation.html



Edited by kevinf on 15 November 2005 at 11:36am
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DonasiaT
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Posted: 15 November 2005 at 10:51am | IP Logged Quote DonasiaT

The Term the Lost Generation refers to the authors who lived in the period following the civil war, like Ernest Hemmingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Following the amazing abundance of casualties in the Civil War, it represents a youthful generation who sought the meaning of life, led very free lives and created some of America’s greatest literature.  Ernest Hemmingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner and John Dos Passos all represent this generation because of their writings are all affected by the Civil War as well as the Jazz Age. Another characteristic of the Lost Generation that they display is a distance from their readers and a great focus on telling a story with actions instead of descriptions.

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Justin P
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Posted: 15 November 2005 at 10:52am | IP Logged Quote Justin P

The Lost generation can best be seen through the abscence of action; it is not directly from an absence of morals.  The jazz age and the post world war I are portrayed as the "lost generation", through the characters' lack of action.  There was an extreme amount of wealth and much time for "leisure" in Fitzgerald's story.  After experiencing so much "life" in the wars, the character in Hemmingway's" the sun also rises feel without a purpose.  They are simply enjoying the pleasures that leisure and a full life can afford.  Therefore, these characters go out drinking, go to clubs, watch bull fights, go to hotels, drink some more (as sean said) without any real pupose or depth in their life.  Fitzgerald best summerizes their lives by calling the rich (daisy) "hollow".  Therefore, Hemmingway's characters that portray the lost generation are Brett and Jake, while Fitzgerald's are Daisy and Tom.  They are hollow, which thus renders them amoral.



Edited by Justin P on 17 November 2005 at 10:27am


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kevinf
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Posted: 15 November 2005 at 11:53am | IP Logged Quote kevinf

I agree with Justin's explanation; this is probably the reasons why many feel there isn't much going on in the book; simply because there wasn't.

To respond to Donasia's post; Hemingway surely distances himself from the actual scene, providing hardly any description at all throughout the novel. It also makes sense that since the authors were so frightened by the immense casualties of the civil war that they left to go to Europe, where they were greeted by a war of the same or perhaps greater magnitude, World War I, "the war to end all wars".



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