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Subject Topic: Across The River and Into the Trees Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Dennis Byrne Jr
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Posted: 04 October 2005 at 10:54pm | IP Logged Quote Dennis Byrne Jr

Well, I started reading "Across the River and Into the Trees" and the novel gets off to a good start, but then the Colonel goes on about the Order and his status as Supreme Commander of I guess the ultra macho group. I've stopped at the beginning of Chapter 8 this morning and don't know if I'll continue.

I mean no disrespect, but the tone became just too kooky like the part of "Islands in the Stream" where E.H. went on about his cats. I'm allergic to cats and generally don't the feline animal.

Didn't the critics rip "Across the River and ..."? I am going to continue on reading "The Constant Gardner" by LeCarre tomorrow.

D. Byrne Jr.

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hijo
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Posted: 05 October 2005 at 12:01am | IP Logged Quote hijo

Dennis: yes, not known as EH's finest tome.

However, after I read it, I came to see what was an incredibly ambitious attempt at taking the aftermath of war and its effect on not only those who participate in it or witness it, but who survive it and find themselves "damaged" but not dead.

It also touched slightly on Nobokov's "Lolita" theme, where because of his chronological age the Colonel knows his love for the young woman is doomed, or would doom her.

But just the description of the engraved Purdys, and the duck hunting, made me read the whole thing.

It is to me a very sad, lonely, heartbreak of a novel.

Admittedly not the most fast-paced, nor easy to translate to the screen. But pretty honest in the emotion, if not the characters.

Allbest,
hijo
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Dennis Byrne Jr
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Posted: 05 October 2005 at 11:05am | IP Logged Quote Dennis Byrne Jr

I'm looking for a partner in literary crime. On Monday, I called a certain elite NYC-based magazine and spoke to a guy there (who was surprisingly helpful). Well, their policy is that stories be sent as the main body of an e-mail. He said, "Try cutting and pasting."

Well, I called a friend the other night and he instructed me on the specifics of "cutting and pasting." My dilemma is how do you cut and paste a 25 page + story. Can anyone offer a helping hand?

I'd like to send this winter tale to the magazine in late December. This isn't a particularly urgent matter.

A while back, I e-mailed the J. Updike web-site and basically stated I prefer Hemingway's "hard-core inebriates" to "high-brow intellectuals."

A few weeks later, I received a somewhat testy reply from a college professor (Moravian College in PA.), but to those folks' credit, they posted my comment.

To E.H.'s credit, "The Old Man and the Sea" to my way of seeing things comes off as stronger, more manly, and optimistic than Updike's final "Rabbit" novella.

Dennis jr.

 

 

 

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Pablo
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Posted: 05 October 2005 at 2:45pm | IP Logged Quote Pablo

     Dennis,

    I would encourage you to continue with the novel and read it through. Across the river and through the trees is the first E.H. novel I have been able to read through once and not feel like I needed to re-read it to grasp the ideas between the ideas.  I am pages from finishing "The sun also rises" and realizing I must re-read it to feel complete.



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hijo
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Posted: 05 October 2005 at 11:57pm | IP Logged Quote hijo

Dennis: if it's literary crime, I'm in.

Try "Select All" in the File, Edit etc menu above your e-mail program or the "Word" or other program you've written the 25+ page story in. Then "Copy", then put your cursor at the start of your e-mail's text, and click "paste."

There's "Cut and Paste" into the body of your e-mail. Above what you've pasted, type a brief: "The story you suggested I send on this way appears below" kind of intro and good luck.

As for a winter tale in December, however, you'll note most magazines, like newspaper special sections, plan their copy far in advance - to get advertisers on board ahead of time, etc. Meaning a winter tale is best proposed in the fall or even summer, while a summer tale is best proposed or offered in December for future publication.

I have a great friend who used to experience and write all his ski stuff the winter before he proposed the stories to the various magazines, including "Ski," which avidly took his stuff.

Hope some of this helps. Always eager to infect more with the terminal disease of writing.

Allbest,
hijo
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babynurse
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Posted: 30 November 2005 at 5:56pm | IP Logged Quote babynurse

Dennis - I think you should continue reading Hemingway. the style is different than what we typically think of hemingway, but it is worth reading. his discussion of the order is humorous if you look at it as old, war experienced men who are sarcastically discussing a fictitious "order". I view it as a mockery of the politics of the military, but I am no literary scholar, just an avid lover of hemingway's works. as you get further on in the book it will become a story of an old soldier who can't help but be bitter, although for Renata's sake, he tries. Who of us hasn't experienced being mean or bitter when we wished we could be nice and agreeable? By the way, Renata and the colonel have an ongoing relationship - they have not just met when she arrives at the bar. I hope you enjoy it. 
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Mike Galvin
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Posted: 01 December 2005 at 11:15pm | IP Logged Quote Mike Galvin

Dennis, In Islands In The Stream, are you refering to the scene where Thomas Hudson is alone and talking to his cat Boise? If so then I suggest you reread that section. I feel it is one of the most moving scenes in the novel.And I'm a dog guy. I don't care for cats.

Mike

Edited by Mike Galvin on 01 December 2005 at 11:16pm
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