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Mrs Weisgerber
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 11:44am | IP Logged Quote Mrs Weisgerber

Great work, gang! Let's go beyond the artchive. Someone look up the
painting at the National Gallery. Who will be the first to discover
Hemingway's role in the PROVENANCE of the painting!!!


Peter--terrific photo. Thank you for posting. I wish I could blink and be
there. How wonderful.

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Eveanandi B.
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 12:53pm | IP Logged Quote Eveanandi B.

The painting by Joan Miro is an example of a painting created by an artist of the Lost Generation. Hemingway was part of this group and the majority of these artists and writers shared similar beliefs and ideas.
His writing is described as: "Main topics were centralized around his love of embellishment of the facts." Since both artists are part of the same movement, something similar can be said about Joan Miro's painting. The painting of the farm has so many different objects and aspects of Spanish life cluttered into the view; that it it almost an embellishment of the many different facets of life in Spain. These are the similarities we see between Joan Miro's painting and Hemingway.

http://users.rowan.edu/~lindman/lost_generation.html

Eveanandi, Katie G, Jay, Adam
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kourtneymm
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 1:01pm | IP Logged Quote kourtneymm

"The Farm" shows how Miro is a little home sick from being away from Spain. It also shows that Miro is in conflict with the current surroundings of Paris that continue to be luring and the surroundings of Spain which were a comfort zone. Hemingway had the same feelings about the picture. He felt that it captured the essence of Spain to the point of helping him to somewhat "get a handle" on the emotion he was getting from missing Spain. A quote from Hemingway about what the painting meant to him can be found on this site:

http://www.california-pawnshop.com/overture/miro.htm

The information from this site is said to be from "Encounters and Reflections" by Arthur Danto.

 

Marcus, Kourtney

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Mike K
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 1:02pm | IP Logged Quote Mike K

In addition to the quotes on Miro's work, the following website also states specifically that Hemingway contracted to buy Miro's "The Farm," implying that he met or at least contacted him during their collective time in Paris:

http://www.mala.bc.ca/~lanes/english/hemngway/ehlife.htm#tim eline

The Miro painting seems to represent a variety of objects scattered across the landscape. The comparisons of an old, crumbling house to a new one in the process of construction, a full pool next to some empty pails, and dying plants right across from their flourishing counterparts seem to suggest an internal conflict Hemingway faced between his dull but steady life in America to a more flamboyant and often disorderly lifestyle in Paris and Spain. A link to the painting:

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/m/miro/farm.jpg

The following article chronicles Hemingway's being influenced by the works of Cezanne, specifically his adopting a greater clarity of symbolism in his writing as a result. It also goes into some similarities between the two men:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0403/is_1_45/ai_5 4895475

Other groups have also mentioned that Hemingway spent time at the same cafe frequented by Picasso, but this article, chronicling the story of a statue stolen from Hemingway's home that was given as a gift to him by Picasso, clearly cements the evidence of a friendship between the two formed in Paris:

http://archives.cnn.com/2000/STYLE/arts/11/15/hemingway.pica sso.ap/index.html

 

Mike, Shaun, Brian



Edited by Mike K on 31 October 2006 at 1:04pm
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christinan
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 1:12pm | IP Logged Quote christinan

What we will have to say about this painting:

There are many themes that show this is an early modersnist painting. One of these is the bold experiment of styles and forms. There are different patterns for the house, the farm, the garage, and the tree. This makes these objects stand out. Miro's thoughts are also mirrored in this painting. Miro shows the empty life after the war. The house seems to be disregarded, animals are everywhere, and the objects such as pales and buckets are thrown around. Ths painting shows the breaking of tradition from science into the stream of conciousness.

This painting shows that Hemingway is longing for Spain. The painting symbolizes his home. it also symbolizes the great emptiness Hemingway feels in Paris. There is nothing around and everything is strange to him, much like the rare patterns in the paintings.

 

Christina, Martina, Giselle

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Matt
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 1:20pm | IP Logged Quote Matt

     There were several contemporary artists and writers with whom Hemingway interacted:

     Ezra Pound helped Hemingway get his career started and served as his mentor.  When Pound was accused in the United States for Treason, Hemingway suggested he go with the insanity plea.
http://library.flawlesslogic.com/pound.htm

     Getrude Stein (a poet) had an apartment in Paris which was a popular place for young writers.  This is how Hemingway met her; they socialized there.  She was the one who coined the phrase "Lost Generation" after Hemingway, because she noticed all the American writers in Paris, who were there between the wars and were "lost."
http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/315

     Joan Miro sold her popular painting mentioned earlier "The Farm" to Hemingway while he was in Paris.  Due to financial difficulties, the one-hundred dollar cost had to be payed in installments.  The final payment was difficult for him, so the waiters at the bar he was at helped him pay for it and from there he owned the painting.  It often inspired him when describing landscapes.
http://www.cim.mcgill.ca/~mmitran/hem/paint.html

Joanna, Justin, Matt, Mike W, Satyam, Sam

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miked
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Posted: 31 October 2006 at 1:23pm | IP Logged Quote miked

Looking at the painting, one can see that not only does the artist, Miro, value family life, but Hemingway values family life as well. One sees this through the woman in the middle of the painting, washing and working. In Spain, women are usually (traditionally everywhere, really) the homemakers. They wash, cook, and so forth.

Hemingway also values hard work, depicted in the woman working in the background, and in the rows of farmed soil.

Miro painted The Farm with heavy influence from his Catalonian heritage; one can perceive many aspects of Catalonian life, such as the pottery. Hemingway appreciates Spanish culture as well, since in TSAR he looks forward to and enjoys visiting Spain.

Miro uses many earth tones and a detailed, realistic perspective in painting The Farm.

www.ndoylefineart.com/miro.html

Kathleen, Zara, Mikael D, Robin, Stevi

 

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hijo
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Posted: 02 November 2006 at 5:44pm | IP Logged Quote hijo

Catalans (Miro, Picasso) looked to France, particularly Paris, more for inspiration than Spain (in terms of creativity).

The Barcelona Bourse (stock exchange) was affiliated not with Madrid but with Paris originally. Catalan is a language that sounds like Spanish spoken with a French accent - an example, former leader Jordi Pujol. In Spanish, the "J" is pronounced like an "H". In Catalan, it is pronounced "juu," like "jean-jacques".

Why?

Spain had no Renaissance. It still hasn't.

Best, and great work,
hijo
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