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parz
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Posted: 05 October 2006 at 9:39am | IP Logged Quote parz

What was Mr.Hemingway's favourite haunt on the Boulevard Saint Germain in Paris?Please do tell me I have to really know.
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Peter Krynicki
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Posted: 05 October 2006 at 1:23pm | IP Logged Quote Peter Krynicki

Brasserie Lipp 151, Bld. Saint-Germain

 

(Mine is two doors down at the Taverne Saint-Germain.)

 

Pjk

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donmadge
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Posted: 06 December 2006 at 2:00pm | IP Logged Quote donmadge

When we were last in Paris we visited Montmartre.  There we past the homes of Wilde and Turing.  I thought about their literary/scientific heroism and I it ocuured to me then that the locale to Hemingway would be irrepressible.  These men were persecuted for their sexuality.  Although Hemingway was macho I cannot find in his writings that he was at all homophobic.

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Paul Hammersten
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Posted: 06 December 2006 at 5:45pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Don

How do you define homophobic?

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Paul



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donmadge
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Posted: 06 December 2006 at 6:13pm | IP Logged Quote donmadge

 

Paul,

Homophobia if I understand it correctly is latent homosexuality characterized by the fear of it being in oneself.  This often leads to outrageous acts of violence towards those who are clearly homosexual.  We discovered this in our family when my stepson declared his homosexuality.  In a drunken rage his natural father clearly confessed his inward fear of the condition, thereby displaying homophobic fear.  The Latin roots are homo –same and phobia – fear.

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Don

 



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Paul Hammersten
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Posted: 07 December 2006 at 9:19am | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Thanks Don,

Using your understanding of homophopia, I can certainly agree with your statement - " I cannot find in his writings that he was at all homophobic. "

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Paul



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Peter Krynicki
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Posted: 07 December 2006 at 11:54am | IP Logged Quote Peter Krynicki

When my friend and I go to Parsi, whatever else we do, we spend a day in Montmartre. There is a self-guided tour in one of her books that we follow from the Metro Station near the Moulin Rouge all the way to the top at Sacre Coeur. If you do this you also pass the "batteau lavoire," literally the wash boat, because the building looks like one of the boats that moored on the Seine and did washing. It was actually a number of very insepensive studios that the struggling artists would use. E.g., Picasso until he became famous. We alsways sit somewhere and have a snack and a drink or two up there, then we browse around the square where all of the artists show off their work. It's a great way to spend a day away from Paris.

http://babette.smugmug.com/photos/96688754-M-1.jpg

I bought one of his sketches which you can see in the photo.

Pjk

 

 

 

   

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hijo
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Posted: 07 December 2006 at 12:47pm | IP Logged Quote hijo

There are also two rival cafes, at the intersection of the Boulevard St. Germain and Boulevard St. Michel (the "Boul Mich.").

The one, Deux Maggots, is quite tourist-oriented these days, but provides (and provided in EH's day) a good spot to watch people from the outside terrace tables. A friend and I always planned to meet there when we were in high school (he grew up there). In 1995, we did just that.

The other, Cafe Cluny, is located across the intersection from Maggots. It is run by a French Basque, Jean-Jacques, and less touristy. But being run by a French Basque (he swore his family had it as long as Deux Maggots has been around), it would attract EH and his friends.

Many of those haunts were the original haunts of the "Boulevardiers."

For an interesting read on Hemingway's initial impression of cafe society in Paris, I recommend reading his article on life at the Rotund - written, I think, for the Toronto Star.

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hijo
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Peter Krynicki
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Posted: 07 December 2006 at 1:52pm | IP Logged Quote Peter Krynicki

I still spend a lot of time at Les Deux Magots, touristy or not. It just very comfortable and you can watch the Parisian world go by from there. But just down the street is the Cafe Bonaparte which is also good, and next to that is the Petit Zinc. This area is good, in the 6th Arr, because you are within walking distance of a lot of things; a couple of blocks from the river and Notre Dame and the Ile de la Cite. And an easy walk to the Luxemborg Gardens and the Tuerilles. We pretty much always stay around here. We are just starting to plan for a late April / early Mat trip in '07. Everyone come over for a drink.

Pjk

 

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