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Paul Hammersten
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Posted: 01 April 2006 at 9:26pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

As I understand - " in that unpublished Jimmy Breen novel he talks about when he was a boy and how his soul used to leave his body and go down the streets of Oak Park and float between the trees and how he partly enjoyed it and partly was afraid of it. " Peter Griffin

Months of writing, 22 chapters, 60,000 words - are we every going to see this published?

Best

Paul



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Leo 168
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Posted: 02 April 2006 at 10:54pm | IP Logged Quote Leo 168

He made a lot of false starts--maybe the Jimmy Breen manuscript wouldn't work as a coherent novel...but I'd sure like to get my teeth into that! Perhaps he had more obe's than he admitted (publicly, at least), and his wounding in Italy allowed him to come out of the obe 'closet'?

  It's interesting (especially if you have an interest in out-of-body experiences), but I'd not like to see the mystification of Hemingway...we don't want to have to step over kneeling pilgrims on our way to tour the house at 907 Whitehead!

  If he had made a big deal out of his paranormal experiences in public, he likely would've been hounded by people wanting 'answers'. I remember reading somewhere (how much truth there was to it, I don't know) that J.D. Salinger had  mutual obe's with his wife or fiance. He was hounded, and he likely doesn't publish because it'd open that can of worms again. Unfortunately, some people think that famous people are public property.

  Ah well, time will tell...

Cheers,

Leo Gillis

 

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Posted: 04 April 2006 at 10:46am | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Papa Cosa

You mentioned the Man-Eaters of Tsavo in a post recently on this UNDER KILIMANJARO topic and I recently mentioned ' powwows '.

Larry...I am reading a neat book now, SOME AFRICAN HIGHWAYS by Caroline Kirkland. The book has a very colorful section on the Uganda Railway. If I remember correctly, the railroad was completed in Dec. 1903 and Kirkland published her book in 1908. An early map of the MOMBASSA-VICTORIA { UGANDA } RAILWAY illustrates the book along with good photos.

" One evening they allowed to have a dance. The rythm of their repetitious tomtoms, the monotonous shuffling of their steps to time kept by hand-clapping, worked them up to a sort of strange frenzy. The music and manner of dancing resembled to a remarkable degree a dance of Crow Indians which I had seen in Wyoming the preceding year. " ---Page 49

Best

Paul



Edited by Paul Hammersten on 06 April 2006 at 9:19am


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Leo 168
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Posted: 09 April 2006 at 10:38pm | IP Logged Quote Leo 168

[If you haven’t yet read to the end of Under Kilimanjaro, you might want to skip this post]

 

Did anyone else find the last several chapters of Under Kilimanjaro very complex compared with the rest of the novel? Hemingway seems to be implying that there was some ‘shaitani’ at work when Miss Mary saw the kongoni/Hartebeest buck before he and the other men in the car did. But, I found it confusing when Ngui says, “He could be the brother of the other,” (p. 435) because I thought he was referring to the two Tommy ‘brothers’ that Hemingway wanted to frighten away from the camp because they were becoming too tame (but I guess I was sleeping at the back of the class).

  

   Anyway, I found it fascinating that Miss Mary shot the kongoni at the same place in the same field where Hemingway let Debba shoot a Tommy (p. 378). It’s almost like Miss Mary is using, without her knowing it, some ‘power’ that lets her reclaim her husband as her own property (no more of the fun and games that Ernest had while she was in Nairobi). Ernest had a special moment at that place with Debba, and Miss Mary comes along and ‘erases’ it. Ernest, Ngui, Keiti, and Mthuka were all worried by how the episode came about (p. 437), and it’s more dramatic because the ‘s’ word (shaitani—possessed magically) wasn’t even used in this instance. I wonder how much of this is based on real events?

  

   I liked the ending—what would’ve been a day “beyond all price” is ruined for Hemingway because he can’t tell Miss Mary what had previously happened at the place where she shot the kongoni. Or does the “one beyond all price” refer to something bigger--like his last day? [pasted from Word if this looks odd...]

Cheers,

Leo



Edited by Leo 168 on 09 April 2006 at 10:47pm
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Posted: 10 April 2006 at 3:58pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Leo...neat observations and questions which I will get back to you about soon.

There probably aren't many of us- yet - who have read UNDER KILIMANJARO all the way to the end...but...here is some good news:

KSU Press helps birth Papa's last

Hemingway's final unpublished novel has sold out first printing, raised profile of university press

By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer

KENT - At the Kent State University Press, printing 750 to 2,000 copies of a book is about the norm.

So it is no exaggeration to say that a recent release is a runaway best-seller.

The press has sold out the first printing of 10,000 copies of Under Kilimanjaro, the last unpublished novel by Ernest Hemingway, and it has embarked on a second printing that will more than double that.

Perhaps more importantly, the publisher is thrilled to have won the right to produce a work of such stature at all.

``It's done a lot to raise our profile,'' said KSU Press Director Will Underwood. ``We're hoping it sells 25,000 copies over its lifetime.''

The book is especially important because it is the last of four manuscripts the American novelist left in a safe-deposit box in Cuba at the time of his death -- life insurance for his heirs, he called it.

The manuscript -- part handwritten, part typed -- is the fictionalized account of Hemingway's trip to Africa with his fourth wife, Mary, from 1953 to '54. Excerpts were printed in Sports Illustrated in the early 1970s; Hemingway's son, Patrick, published an abridged version called True at First Light in 1999.

By the time the manuscript came to the notice of the KSU Press, the work was in the hands of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation, which is sometimes called the Hemingway Society. It was founded by Mary Hemingway to further study and scholarship of the works of her late husband, who died in 1961.

The society wanted to produce a work that was as close to the original as possible. It chose the Kent press because many society members had had dealings with it and liked what they saw, Underwood said.

The press is also publishing study tools about Hemingway.

The work of massaging the rough, 850-page manuscript fell to two Hemingway scholars and retired English professors: Robert W. Lewis of the University of North Dakota and Robert E. Fleming of the University of New Mexico. They came to be affectionately known to the KSU Press staff as ``the Roberts.''

The work was a challenge, Lewis is quoted as saying in the fall issue of the North Dakota University magazine, UND Discovery.

Not only was Hemingway a poor speller, but he also used words from other languages -- French, Swahili, Spanish -- in the text.

``You couldn't say for sure that it was finished because he might have come back and said, `This loose end needs to be tied up,' '' Lewis said.

And although Hemingway had called the manuscript his ``African book,'' it clearly needed a catchier title. It was Lewis who came up with Under Kilimanjaro.

As for the Kent State Press, it had to agree to do things the way the foundation wanted, Underwood said.

That meant it received only the U.S. rights for the work and could print only a hardback edition, for example. But those were small sacrifices, given the fame of the author.

The work stands out in many ways for Underwood and his staff, which includes marketing manager Susan Cash and editor in chief Joanna Craig. Not only is it the first work of fiction published by the press, but it also is far outpacing any other Kent State book in sales. Only Ohio and its People, by retired University of Akron professor George Knepper, can compete. It has sold 24,000 copies, but has been in print since 1989.

Now, Under Kilimanjaro shares space in Underwood's conference room with 800 other titles the press has published since its inception in the 1960s. About 600 are still in print. Many are about military or local history, true crime and politics.

Some books serve a small slice of the reading public; some have a more universal appeal.

Underwood hopes Under Kilimanjaro, available at bookstores or through the KSU Press for $34, will fall increasingly in the latter category.

For those who want the best, the press printed a special,leather-bound, hand-numbered edition that sells for $75. Almost half of those 1,000 copies have been sold.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at 330-996-3729 or cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com

 

Best

Paul



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Posted: 14 April 2006 at 3:55pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Leo 168 wrote:

[If you haven’t yet read to the end of Under Kilimanjaro, you might want to skip this post]

 

Did anyone else find the last several chapters of Under Kilimanjaro very complex compared with the rest of the novel? Hemingway seems to be implying that there was some ‘shaitani’ at work when Miss Mary saw the kongoni/Hartebeest buck before he and the other men in the car did. But, I found it confusing when Ngui says, “He could be the brother of the other,” (p. 435) because I thought he was referring to the two Tommy ‘brothers’ that Hemingway wanted to frighten away from the camp because they were becoming too tame (but I guess I was sleeping at the back of the class).

  

   Anyway, I found it fascinating that Miss Mary shot the kongoni at the same place in the same field where Hemingway let Debba shoot a Tommy (p. 378). It’s almost like Miss Mary is using, without her knowing it, some ‘power’ that lets her reclaim her husband as her own property (no more of the fun and games that Ernest had while she was in Nairobi). Ernest had a special moment at that place with Debba, and Miss Mary comes along and ‘erases’ it. Ernest, Ngui, Keiti, and Mthuka were all worried by how the episode came about (p. 437), and it’s more dramatic because the ‘s’ word (shaitani—possessed magically) wasn’t even used in this instance. I wonder how much of this is based on real events?

  

   I liked the ending—what would’ve been a day “beyond all price” is ruined for Hemingway because he can’t tell Miss Mary what had previously happened at the place where she shot the kongoni. Or does the “one beyond all price” refer to something bigger--like his last day? [pasted from Word if this looks odd...]

Cheers,

Leo

Leo...where to begin...but to agree with you that the ending of UNDER KILIMANJARO is indeed very complex!

I think the " one beyond price in..." is refering to something bigger. As is the Mary character's pronouncement [ not for Mary but for the Hemingway character and for Hemingway himself] " It's getting late and we'll have no time ".

I have always believed the " in... " needs to end the book, unfinished, and was done deliberately by Hemingway.

The textual notes to UNDER KILIMANJARO would lead one to think there were many ' marginal notes of dates of his writing ' when there were very few in the manuscript/typescript of Hemingway's AFRICA BOOK.

One  note was with what Hemingway wrote on pages 440 & 441. The writing was done Valentines Day's Eve.

On Valentines Day Hemingway did not work on the book but wrote a Valentine for Mary. He finishes the book Feb. 27th.

If you would like a copy of what I wrote about all this in my book ASANTE PAPA! [ www.asantepapa.4t.com ] I would be more than happy to send a copy - just send me a ppe.

I will get back to your post above soon. Thanks

Best

Paul

 



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Leo 168
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Posted: 14 April 2006 at 10:24pm | IP Logged Quote Leo 168

Thanks Paul (I sent one of those pm's),

It was a strange place to leave off a manuscript--you'd think he'd go back and finish his sentence or thought if he was interrupted by the phone or doorbell! Maybe he did leave it like that on purpose.

I had to take Under Kilimanjaro back to the library, but I'll eventually buy my own copy.

No hurry for any replies (we all get busy and have other 'hobbies' besides Hemingway!). Cheers--Leo

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Posted: 15 April 2006 at 5:55pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Leo

If you can, please get a copy of BY-LINE - Hemingway from your library.

The final By-Line in the book is " A Situation Report " for  Look - September 4, 1956 refered to in the final textual note to UNDER KILIMANJARO.

From what they wrote in their note, I do not  believe the editors of UNDER KILIMANJARO understood the true light this By-Line sheds on ' our ' topic of interest.

Anyway...your having read " A Situation Report " might help you connect [ I say ' connect ' for you surely do not have to agree!  ] with what I will be sending you.

I liked your eagle story...neat...I have a real good one I will share with you. [ One either saved my life or at the least saved me from a severe mauling! ]

My wife and I have been to Vancouver. We once took a cruise up and back The Inside Passage. We will again...hopefully next May, 2007. It was awesome!!!

Happy Easter to you and your wife.

Best

Paul



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Leo 168
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Posted: 22 April 2006 at 9:28pm | IP Logged Quote Leo 168

Hi Paul,

I've borrowed a copy of 'By-line'. I had to read 'The Christmas Gift' first...will get to 'A Situation Report'.

My wife and I have seen some of The Inside Passage (Port Hardy to Prince Rupert, on BC Ferries--that ship sunk recently and, tragically, two persons were lost). On that trip I saw a pod of orcas cruising and dipping at full speed--beautiful!

Have you read Mariel Hemingway's book? I skimmed through a bit of it today at the West Vancouver library (don't live there, so couldn't take it out). From what I've read, I gather she's a very intelligent and intuitive person, and her views on "unconditional love" knocked my socks off because I know exactly what she's talking about. My mom said hello to her once in Central Park in NYC when she (Mariel H.) was busy filming something.

Anyway, thought you'd like to know that I saw two juvenile eagles today in West Van--a lovely sight. The seagulls were a little upset, but I think the eagles were more interested in the Chihuahua's at the nearby doggy park.

Cheers--Leo



Edited by Leo 168 on 23 April 2006 at 8:02pm
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Posted: 24 April 2006 at 4:16pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Hi Leo

I like the quote you have in the picture block on your posts...

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I like how Hemingway ends chapter 19 of UNDER KILIMANJARO -

" I said my prayers for luck..."

Hemingway most likely expected readers of his AFRICA BOOK [ when it would be published after his death ] to have read ' The Christmas Gift '. I am glad to learn you have read the piece.

I will look for  Mariel Hemingway's book.

Neat you saw more eagles.

I had a woodcock sighting while flushing a hydrant last week! Wonder if Hemingway ever hunted woodcock?

Best

Paul



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