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Leo 168
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Posted: 25 April 2006 at 7:14pm | IP Logged Quote Leo 168

Thanks Paul,

I liked that quote too--reminds me of how his sense of humour came through in Under Kilimanjaro.

I say, woodcock? Didn't Hemingway hunt anything that moved?

Cheers--Leo

 

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Paul Hammersten
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Posted: 26 April 2006 at 4:07pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

"  In this pageant of the life history and hunt of the American woodcock, you will follow author Tom F. Waters and his field companion, Roy, on hunts through the alder swamps and wild pastures of northern Minnesota in pursuit of this most engaging of upland game birds. These stories will give you a few belly-chuckles, and maybe some lumps in your throat, but above all, they will give you a fresh appreciation of this captivating bird and the ethics of the hunt--and a greater respect for its essential (but fleeting) habitat. "

Publisher Photo TIMBERDOODLE TALES 
by WATERS, TOM F.

Best

Paul



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Leo 168
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Posted: 03 May 2006 at 10:09pm | IP Logged Quote Leo 168

Re: A Situation Report (in By-Line: Ernest Hemingway)

Hi Paul,

When Hemingway says that he'll never have his writing interrupted again (by filming, etc.), do you think that this provides some evidence that he left off Under Kilimanjaro where he intended to? I get that impression.

(By the way, I believe I misunderstood you when you wrote to send you a ppe--my apologies! I'd like to buy your book some day, but I'll have to wait a bit)

Cheers,

Leo (some Scottish ancestry...)

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Paul Hammersten
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Posted: 09 May 2006 at 10:08am | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Re: some Scottish ancestry...

Leo...you must have heard of curling...here is something I wrote for my High School class website. The piece includes a ' borrowed ' phrase from UNDER KILIMANJARO! I wonder if it can be spotted by anyone.

YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN!
       by Paul Hammersten
  
  
  " That will never do kid, " Dom assured me while I was twirling several
  strands of spaghetti on the fork I jabbed into the mound of steaming hot
  pasta and sauce piled high on my plate.
  
  Taking a puff on his cigarette then resting it in the ash tray, Dom picked up
  both a fork and a large spoon.
  
  " This is how Mama taught my brothers and me to eat spaghetti! "
  
  On returning home to Wellesley, MA from the curling bonspiels we
  competed in throughout New England when I was in high school, Dom
  DiMaggio, our chaperone, would take us out to eat at Ken's Steakhouse
  { of Ken's salad dressing fame } in Framingham. Once we were all seated
  around his corner table, Dom relaxed and enjoyed watching us eat while he
  sipped a drink, puffed on Lucky Strike's, and shared tales of his playing
  days with the Boston Red Sox in Fenway Park.
  
  Listening to his stories, I regretted never seeing Dom play, but I don't
  regret that at my first  game at Fenway, a grade school graduation gift,
  I was able to watch the memorable Pumpsie Green play ball.
  
  Elijah Jerry " Pumpsie " Green got his nickname because he always
  pumped his glove with his fist like catchers do.
  
  Twelve years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947,
  Pumpsie joined Boston. He was the first African-American player in Red
  Sox history. The Boston Red Sox was the last Major League team to
  include Black players on its roster. Ted Williams paved Pumpsie's way by
  choosing to warm up with him before each game.
  
  I have heard it said that no game can compare to one's first at Fenway.
  For me, this saying is untrue. All I have loved about the game of baseball I
  will be taking with me to Fenway Park this summer. Along with my
  memories of Pumpsie I will also be taking someone special out to the ball
  park for her first Major League ball game - my bride!

  And I have also heard it said that you can't go home again. This saying is
  equally untrue for me. All I have loved about living in Wellesley and my
  school boy days I will be taking with me to the Wellesley High School
  Reunion this Fall. Along with these memories of people and places I will be
  bringing my bride to Wellesley for the first time!
 
Best
 
Paul

 

 



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Posted: 19 May 2006 at 4:23pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Speaking of woodcocks above...imagine my surprise to read in SPEAK TO THE EARTH by Vivienne De Watteville chapter X - A Big Tusker, The Rains, Digression On Auras Page 189 :

" You would think that anything so large as an elephant must be easy to find, yet in fact no beast can be so elusive. I have watched an elephant,who meant to slip away without my knowing, move over crackling twigs and dry leaves like a shadow. He had the same marvellous astuteness as a woodcock, who will sometimes get up with such an ado that you are too much surprised to throw up your gun, and at other times will fly off as silently as an owl before you have seen him. "

Neat book by the way...

See THE SLOPES OF KILIMANJARO BY CARLOS BAKER - http://72.14.207.104/search?q=cache:afwUQ7azMioJ:americanher itage.com/articles/magazine/ah/1968/5/1968_5_40.shtml+%22+am erican+heritage+magazine%22+%2B+%22+Vivienne+de+watteville%2 2&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=1

And  VIVENNE DE WATTEVILLE, HEMINGWAY'S COMPANION ON KILIMANJARO BY RW LEWIS.

Best

Paul



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Posted: 29 May 2006 at 11:46am | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

Leo

Speaking of Scotland and Africa books above...HUNTER by J.A.Hunter [ from Scotland ] is a really! good read.

And speaking of curling ...it was interesting to read in Vivienne De Watteville's book - Speak To The Earth - Part II The Mountain { Mount Kenya } - the section on The Curling Pond beginning page 250.

" To-day my objective was the Curling Pond, a frozen pool in front of an overhanginglip of ice { part of Lewis Glacier, and about halfway down it}. It might be large enough to curl on, though I believe that it has been used only twice in history, when Mr. Melhuish skated on it. "

Here is a picture of a real old timer skating on the Curling Pond.

http://images.rgs.org/imageDetails.aspx?barcode=29687

Best

Paul



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Posted: 09 June 2006 at 4:22pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

 I just finished SPEAK TO THE EARTH by Vivienne De Watteville. I know there are
the articles by Baker and Lewis mentioned above that show this authors influence on Hemingway's SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO and I find much in his AFRICA BOOK that prompts me to believe the influence was strong as he lived the experiences of his second safari then wrote about them in this work.

There are passages in SPEAK TO THE EARTH that prompts me to think that this book was not only a major influence on Hemingway's African writings but also influenced FWTBT.

For example :

The entire passage on page 118 beginning with - " ...I sometimes came near the fringes of it. Lying with my heart pressed against the red earth and my forehead upon the stones was not physical nearness only; for as I lay there thinking how I, too, was composed of that same earth I touched and loved..."

Is anyone familiar with SPEAK TO THE EARTH: Wanderings And Reflections Among Elephants And Mountains?

Best

Paul



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