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jellero
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Posted: 01 May 2006 at 5:30pm | IP Logged Quote jellero

hello, i just found this site and was wondering if someone could please
help me out. about 20+ years ago i read a book about hemmingway,
either a biography or auto biography, can't remember. it told of the trip
from chicago to northern michigan right where i grew up. one chapter
ernest shot a deer out of season and got his father very angry not
because he did that but that he got caught. i think i would remember the
name if i saw it... thanks a lot, john
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bookman
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Posted: 01 May 2006 at 7:18pm | IP Logged Quote bookman

I'm not sure of the exact book you're talking about, but one possibility might be "Hemingway In Michigan" by Constance Cappel. It covered Hemingway's activities in Michigan quite well and with a lot of attention to the locale. It's one of the few dealing specifically with his time in Michigan. (Out of print, but can be obtained used on Amazon or any of the used book sites.)

Fictionally, there was an unfinished short story entitled, "The Last Good Country", which has Nick Adams running from the law after poaching a deer. It's one of my favorite stories, and many believe loosely based on an incident in Hemingway's youth when he had illegally shot a blue heron.

I do recall reading somewhere, possibly in his letters, of Hemingway having "potted" at a deer with a .22, while on a fishing trip with his buddies, but I don't think his father was around at the time. (And it never said if he actually hit or killed the deer.)
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jellero
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Posted: 01 May 2006 at 10:37pm | IP Logged Quote jellero

he shot a blue heron??? whatever for? thanks but i don't think that was it.
the michigan one i mean but i will read it. he killed a deer out of season
and his dad knocked him around for it, very angry. ernest said "but you've
shot deer out of season many times, why are you so mad at me?" and pop
said "i never got caught..." or something like that. john
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bookman
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Posted: 01 May 2006 at 11:10pm | IP Logged Quote bookman

One incident that I do remember reading about is when Ernest shot a porcupine. His father believed in hunting for food, and never killing anything needlessly. So he was upset with Ernest, and to teach him a lesson, made him eat the porcupine.
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docnme
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Posted: 02 May 2006 at 9:51am | IP Logged Quote docnme

HI Jellero,

The two incidents that I have read about, both mentioned here.  Shooting the blue heron up on Walloon Lake: in the book "At The Hemingways"by Marcelline Hemingway-Sanford, she knew exactly what happened. Another incident,(the blue heron /or the deer:) mentioned in the" biography by Jeffrey Meyers."  I don't know if they are one and the same incident, in one case, it says that his mother covered for him when the authorities came to their door, as his father was already back in Chicago, and E.H. ran for his Uncle George's up in the U.P. I don't recall that he really got into that much trouble from his family about it, but  it did not go over to well up north, as he and his friends were making their presence known in near-by Boine City in the wee hours of the morning.

Yes , his father was a very good shot and hunter and did not believe in shooting anything that you were not going to eat. It was the Native Americans up north who gave him the nickname, Eagle Eye.  I have also read the story about shooting and eating the porcupine, I believe that it is true. His father also cooked all of the game that he shot and fish that he caught.

Best,

docnme



Edited by docnme on 02 May 2006 at 9:56am


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jellero
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Posted: 02 May 2006 at 11:26am | IP Logged Quote jellero

i know it was a deer. he seems to have been a bit trigger happy. i will
keep digging, thanks. walloon lake is just over the hill from lake
charlevoix where i grew up, near boyne city, ironton, east jordan... john
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Paul Hammersten
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Posted: 02 May 2006 at 4:16pm | IP Logged Quote Paul Hammersten

I do not know the book about a deer.

" He shot a blue heron??? " you asked. Besides the well known incident mentioned by docme, the heron is an important tie in with the name [ Dick Herron ] of a main character in another Michigan writers book.

Before Hemingway left for " the war to end all wars ", he maintained that Stewart Edward White was one of his 3 favorite authors.

" The Silent Places " by White was arguably his favorite book. [ Of all his works this book was also White's favorite .]

White's tale of a canoe trip in the Northwoods fired Hemingway's imagination like none other and prompted him to write in his High School notebook " Get to Hudson Bay or bust " .

Hudson Bay, the birthplace of the Northwest Wind Keewaydin, would remain a source of inspiration for Hemingway long after the day in 1916 he wrote down a trip list for his planned " Moose River Hudson Bay Trip " . Indeed - the day he died Papa was following the path already set by the hero of his favorite poem - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's THE SONG OF HIAWATHA - "...to the regions of the Homewind of the Northwest Wind, Keewaydin " .

Michael Reynolds in " The Young Hemingway " notes the influence of " The Silent Places " by S.E.White on Ernest Hemingway's first story - " The Judgement of Manitou " . Reynolds reveals that after returning from the war, Hemingway returned { as he would repeatedly do throughout his life } to travel in his imagination "...to the regions of the Homewind" . He wrote a story that spring set in the north of Hudson Bay. [Hemingway Collection - JFK Library ]

Reynolds suggests that there are " raw elements " in this story that " would be refinded in Hemingway's mature writing " - even found in " Hemingway's late if not final story - " The Last Good Country " .

It is exciting for me to explore the fact that late in life Hemingway, the Mzee, continued to turn in his spirit and imagination, as he repeatedly did through out his life to the ' Regions Of The Homewind ' and the work of S.E.White.

The name ' Dick ' of the main character in White's book re-surfaced in Hemingway's first short story.

May-May-Quan, the young Indian girl who taggs along with Dick, at first unwelcomed, North to " The Silent Places " is called by him Little Sister ['Littless'! in The Last Good Country ] .

Littless resembles Little Sister with her " tanned brown skin - dark eyes - and brown legs " .

Nick remains the White man but with his Indian moccasins and knowledge of their ways etc., his identification with the vanished Indian is complete.

At the conclusion of THE SILENT PLACES Little Sister dies...ending Dick's childhood. Only in the " wavering slopes and illusions " over the snow-swept plains of the North may they be seen together again.

The anticipated reading of WUTHERING HEIGHTS in THE LAST GOOD COUNTRY foreshadows the unwritten end and completion of the story. As does  its mention in Hemingway's UNDER KILIMANJARO foreshadow the unwritten end to this completed book.

Mysteries remain of course for as Jed Kiley in HEMINGWAY: A Title Fight In Ten Rounds wrote," Ernest was the world's most controversial writer, and his death came the same way his stories ended - with the reader still guessing".

The above is from my copyrighted book FORWARD KEEWAYDIN: To the Regions of the Homewind.

Best

Paul



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jellero
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Posted: 02 May 2006 at 6:52pm | IP Logged Quote jellero

well the book wasn't about a deer but that episode was in the book i am
looking for stands out in my mind. the library administrator here is
helping me but someone i bet remembers even if i can't. he let me go
through the old card file down in the basement today.
i used to catch porcupines with a trash can and hunk of plywood, then
take them off the island and let them loose in an attempt to protect my
dogs. no need to shoot them... john
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docnme
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Posted: 03 May 2006 at 9:33am | IP Logged Quote docnme

Helo Paul,

I found your post inspiring and interesting ,(as always).  Everytime I go to that area up north I feel the peace and understand the benefit of the  (quiet places). Did not know what Keewaydin meant until reading your posts a couple of years ago. NO WONDER it is called "regions of the homewind".  No matter what else happened in his life;  There I always know how spiritual E.H. really was,  and the deep impression that place and time of life left on him. Yes, he always went back to" regions of the homewind," at least in spirit.   I will have to read the book, "The Silent Places" by S.E.White.

By the way:" Back To The Bible " can be found at 1.Bravenet web services, on left sidebar click, More Food 2.Free Redirection my heart 3. Food for Thought page 4.Daily Inspirations, scrol down to bottom of page to "Back to the Bible", I know there is a shortcut, but I like the journey.

Thanks for sharing that,

Best, docnme



Edited by docnme on 03 May 2006 at 10:02am


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hijo
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Posted: 03 May 2006 at 11:12am | IP Logged Quote hijo

There has been much discussion in various biographies of how such an incident caused EH to have a kind of phobia of breaking the law.

I'm not sure personally the relevance of the incident itself, as opposed to its affect on his personality.

Accidentally shooting something - out of season, or out of eagerness - is hardly unique among hunters, especially younger inexperienced ones. It's the affect it has on the people - how a father, trying to teach his son right from wrong, or at least not to embarrass the family, reacts, and how the people themselves feel.

I recall a story EH wrote essentially describing the difference between "shooters," people who hunted and shot game for food and survival, versus "sportsmen," who shot game for neither food nor survival, but only for "sport," having no respect for the fact they've taken and ended a life (taking onto themselves that power most often reserved to God).

It's also instructive to recall (I think) that the famous "Indian Wars," which resulted in the remaining natives of the land being pushed onto reservations "for their own protection" and so, for instance, gold could be mined in the Dakotas, officially ended in the U.S. in 1890. Think of that date and remember when EH was born. How long from that date was it when he first realized he was in the UP and so were they? And that "they" were "different"?

In the hinter-lands of Wisconsin - where I grew up - and Michigan, and Minnesota, and New York, tribes continue to survive (because many went into Canada to escape the "Indian Wars"), after a fashion. If you would like to learn the fashion, read "The Torrents of Spring," though to truly catch it all I think it needs to be read with a few snifters of absinthe.

In the late 1980s, citizens of states such as Wisconsin openly discussed the idea of "renegotiating" the existing treaties with various tribes - the Ojibway, Chippewa, Menominee, Lac du Flambeu, Black Hawk, etc - as various Departments of Natural Resources were limiting fishing and hunting by regulating it (for non-Indians). The citizens, who uttered such nostalgic phrases as "the only good Indian is a dead Indian," were unhappy that the Indians, who ceded their land that we gave Indian names to, had been given a relatively free rein to hunt and fish on it in return. They could gill-net, spear-fish, bow hunt, whatever. Imagine. Like they had their own laws.

My point is EH early on seemed to recognize and sympathize with the fact there were people in the world, as he later explained, who were "bitched" long before the Holocaust. I think some of the remorse that comes through in both "The Last Good Country" and other stories is the natural response of someone who sees something wrong in the world but feels powerless to fix it. In other words, everyone with a compassionate bone in their body is "bitched" from the start. Kind of like some religious beliefs, isn't it?

And I think his love for people who survive - endure, I imagine he'd correct - is part of what invests his stories with such power.

You pulls the trigger, there's a bang, something dies. Even when you're happy with successfully completing what you've set out to do, there's a pang. I asked a friend of mine, who hunts Elk every winter, if he ever feels sorry for killing what becomes his families' winter food. His response: "I never don't."

You shoot something you're not supposed to - either because you don't plan to eat it, or sell it, or do anything but bury it and hope no one sees you - and it could just be the ghost that haunts you all your life.

At least when you take a sip of scotch - the taste of remorse.

But that's another story.

Best,
hijo
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