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The Sun Also Rises (Forum Locked Forum Locked)
 Ernest Hemingway Message Boards : The Sun Also Rises
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DariusC
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Posted: 22áNovemberá2005 at 12:01am | IP Logged Quote DariusC

I do not agree Hemingway is making his characters in The Sun Also Rises heroes by making them people of action only.  Few exhibit archetypical heroic qualities.  None of which includes the characters Cohn, Jake, Brett or Mike.  The only character who seems fitting to the title of a hero is Romero, in his strong-willingness to continue his attack on Cohn even when he is being slaughtered.  Romero seems to be on a quest to win over the respect of Cohn and fears weakness itself.  As a strong bull-fighter, he is not often scared.  Romero exhibits warrior like qualities, even in the physical sense with his slaying of bulls.
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Mrs Weisgerber
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Posted: 22áNovemberá2005 at 8:41am | IP Logged Quote Mrs Weisgerber

DariusC wrote:
The only character who seems fitting to the title of a hero is Romero, in his strong-willingness to continue his attack on Cohn even when he is being slaughtered. 

Perhaps this is why Jake is okay with Pedro... Romero is a good, let's say fully equipped, surrogate for Jake?

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SeanM
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Posted: 22áNovemberá2005 at 3:22pm | IP Logged Quote SeanM

Ha ha that's funny Mrs, Weisgerber!

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BryanK
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Posted: 22áNovemberá2005 at 7:36pm | IP Logged Quote BryanK

Though I do not think that Hemingway makes his characters heroes by having describing them only with action, I do believe that he is making a point about the Lost Generation.  It is unfair to compare someone like Pedro Romero to someone like Jake because Pedro is untainted by the war.  I believe that Hemingway is trying to reveal the effects that the war has on Jake, and in doing so, Jake becomes the pitiful character that he is portrayed as through excessive drinking and a lack of motivation.  Jake is stunned because people perceive him differently than they used to.  In effect, he wishes to revert back to the man he used to be, and becomes a character similar to Jay Gatsby in his romance with Daisy.

The following is the last stanza of a World War I poem by Wilfred Owen called "Disabled":

Now, he will spend a few sick years in institutes, (40)
And do what things the rules consider wise,
And take whatever pity they may dole.
Tonight he noticed how the women's eyes
Passed from him to the strong men that were whole
.
How cold and late it is!
Why don't they come (45)
And put him into bed?
Why don't they come?

The soldier once gained all of the attention from women, but now gains none of it.  Like Jake, he has lost his freedom and he must live his life as a new man affected by war.  Jake's love for Brett has lost its Úlan because he has accepted that their relationship is no longer possible.  However, his love for her does still exist.  By using verbs but no description, Hemingway is able to show how the war affected Jake both physically and emotionally.



Edited by BryanK on 22áNovemberá2005 at 7:39pm
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Alex P
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Posted: 23áNovemberá2005 at 8:05pm | IP Logged Quote Alex P

Hemingway is not  trying to make Jake, Breet & Cohn the heroes of  TSAR. A connection has already been established between Hemingway  and TS Eliot, a frequent contributor to the lost generation.  Hemingway is making a connection to Eliot's wasteland as eliot presents a society full of "hollow men" and a society with only shallow emotions and facades. Hemingway presents his characters along the lines of Eliot's as a warning to people, warning them to not become one of the hollow men.

That's an awesome poem Krichilsky.

 
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Brian L.
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Posted: 27áNovemberá2005 at 9:57pm | IP Logged Quote Brian L.

I would say that the main characters in the novel are not heroes. They have not taken action to help out anyone else. I think that the main characters are doing repetitive actions over and over again. They seem to be going around in circles. Like Steffanie said, they are people of a useless type of action. The characters have are personal heroes between each other. Jake helps out every one of his friends. During the war, Jake was a hero.
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lindsayk
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Posted: 29áNovemberá2005 at 12:48am | IP Logged Quote lindsayk

I disagree with many of the previous posts, I've found some heroic actions the characters, Jake in particular, have exhibited that you all have missed.

We all know Jake is a war hero. He suffered a devastating injury as a result of his battlefield efforts. But his continuation with his life is truly heroic. He could have given up; he could have ended all his pain and suffering once and for all. But he didn't. He continued on with his life, still filled with alcohol and carelessness to help escape the pain, but that was his own decision as well. I believe, however, that he makes up for all of this with his courteous, gentlemanly actions, such as paying for himself and the others.

Jake also fell in love with Brett, even though he knew she would never love him, and he would never be able to express his love for her physically. He even goes as far as introducing her to Pedro Romero, a surrogate as Mrs. Weisgerber said. He wants to satisfy her, even if it's not with himself. It must take a lot of love to be able to suggest a partner for the one you love, knowing full well that it could never be you. I admire Jake a lot for that.


Edited by lindsayk on 29áNovemberá2005 at 12:49am
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ChineduJ
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Posted: 29áNovemberá2005 at 1:12am | IP Logged Quote ChineduJ

Interesting point Lindsay, I agree. Jake could have ended his life there and then on the battlefield. He has my respect for that, but does that actually make him a hero? Yes. When faced with adverse situations, anyone can choose to give up and die, but it takes true courage to live.

Its just a shame though that our hero drowns himself in alcohol and chases an adulturer.  

Im curious as to what Cohn's purpose in this novel is if anyone cares. Does he represent the Lost Generation in general? I mean he fits the description doesn't he? Wandering around, searching for something more in life... does anyone agree, or is he just some random loser?



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Candace E
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Posted: 30áNovemberá2005 at 9:51am | IP Logged Quote Candace E

In a way, I am forced to believe that the characters in The Sun Also Rises are heroes, simply because of the definitions we as a society have come up with.  I think we define a hero as someone who takes action.  However, just taking action should not qualify an individual into the heroism hall of fame! A hero is not only someone who takes action but is taking that action of others, and making a difference in the end result of it all.  I think that most of the characters in The Sun Also Rises are not heroes at all, except maybe Jake.  He has proven he contains a few wualities of a hero, like not giving up in battle, carrying on life although he has lost some masculinity, and constantly taking responsibility for himself ans others. 

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